How to dye eggs for Easter

Get stuck into a classic Easter craft activity the kids will love – colourful, fun and easy!

What you’ll need

Hardboiled or blown-out eggs (see instructions below)

Food colouring

Vinegar

Water (at room temperature)

White or light coloured crayons (optional)

Hardboiled or blown out?

The first thing to decide is if you want to hardboil or blow out your eggs. Blown-out eggs can be kept forever, but they are much more fragile, so they might not be suitable for very young children.

  • To make hardboiled eggs: In a large pot, place your eggs with enough cold water to completely cover them. Place the pot on the stove on high heat and bring the water to the boil. Once boiling, cover the pan and remove from heat. Leave the eggs in the water to sit for 15 minutes, then run under cold water until the shells are cool to touch.
  • To blow out eggs: Wash your eggs well. Using a needle, carefully poke a small hole at each end of the raw egg. Hold the egg over a bowl, put your mouth to one of the holes, and blow – the egg liquid should come out the other end. Once empty, rinse the egg with water and a little vinegar and carefully put aside to dry.

Making dyed eggs

1. If you want patterned eggs, use white or light-coloured crayons to draw shapes, designs or messages onto the blank eggs first. The crayon will stop the dye from absorbing on that area of the shell.

2. For each colour you want to use, you’ll need a small container, bowl or mug. Mix together ½ a cup of water, 1 tablespoon of vinegar and around 20 drops of food colouring in each one.

3. Experiment with mixing colours – a great chance to sneak a little art theory lesson in with the kids!  For example, you can mix red and blue to make purple, blue and yellow to make green, and red and yellow to make orange.

4. Gently dip your eggs into the dye, one at a time. You may need to add more water to the container so that the egg can be completely submerged. The longer you leave the eggs in the dye, the more vibrant the colours will be.

5. When your egg reaches the desired colour, carefully remove with a spoon. Leave to dry on a paper towel or in egg cups.

6. Further decorate with sequins, paint or glitter pens to your heart’s content.

Recommended reading - Get involved with parkrun

Lifestyle

Parkrun: What to expect

Want to give parkrun a go? Here's everything you need to know for your first time.

Read more
Community

People of parkrun: David

David was obese and out of confidence, but turned his life around after attending a Parkrun.

Read more
Community

People of parkrun: Melissa

Be inspired by Melissa's story, showing how mental resilience can guide you past adversity.

Read more
Community

People of parkrun: Trish

Even after weight loss, it wasn't until Trish started attending Parkrun that she made real progress.

Read more
Lifestyle

4 ways to prevent running injuries

Look after your body while you run. Here's how to lower your chances of getting injured.

Read more
Community

Why I Run: Chris Walker

Chris Walker explains why he continues to run and raise funds for various causes.

Read more
Community

Why I Run: Deb and Gerred Sherwood

Deb Sherwood and son Gerred share why they will be running at the Medibank Family Run.

Read more
Community

Why I Run: Enrique Suana

Enrique Suana on how his passion for running allows him to give something back to the sport he loves.

Read more
Community

Why I Run: Peter Ryan

Peter Ryan on why he's been running marathons since 1978.

Read more
Community

Why I Run: The Wilson Family

The Wilson family on combining their love for the outdoors with a special cause close to their hearts.

Read more
Community

Why I run: Annie Crawford

Annie Crawford's philanthropic contributions created Can Too, which raises money for cancer research.

Read more

For full functionality of this site it is necessary to enable JavaScript. Here are instructions on how to enable JavaScript in your web browser.