Mediterranean vegetable and macadamia pizza recipe

Pizza with sumptuous veggies and the creamy, vitamin-packed goodness of macadamias

Australia is the birthplace of macadamias. They were considered a delicacy by Aboriginal people, and are the only native Australian food to be developed and successfully traded internationally as a commercial food product. And with their creamy, buttery taste, they’re also really good for you, packed full of vitamins, minerals, protein and fibre.

This healthy pizza recipe makes delicious use of macadamias, from base to pesto to toppings, along with plenty of flavoursome veggies and herbs. Now that’s what we call a nourishing weekend treat.

Serves: 4

Ingredients

Pizza dough

1 1/2 cups warm water

1 sachet dried yeast

Pinch of caster sugar

4 1/2 cups plain flour, sifted

1 teaspoon salt

1/4 cup macadamia oil, plus extra for brushing

Macadamia pesto

300g semi-dried tomatoes

2 tablespoons macadamia oil

1 1/4 cups unsalted macadamias

2 teaspoons chopped rosemary

1-2 tablespoons of the semi-dried tomato oil

Pizza topping

Macadamia oil for brushing

2/3 cup macadamia pesto

2 large red capsicums, roasted, skin removed and cut into strips

1 large eggplant, trimmed, cut into 5mm-thick slices

2 zucchini, trimmed, thinly sliced lengthways

180g bocconcini

1/2 cup unsalted macadamias

80g rocket leaves

Pepper, for seasoning

Method

To make the pizza dough

1. Combine the water, yeast and sugar in a small bowl. Set aside for 5 minutes or until foamy. Combine the flour and salt in a large bowl and make a well in the centre. Add the yeast mixture and oil. Use a round-bladed knife in a cutting motion to mix until combined. Use your hands to bring the dough together in the bowl.

2. Turn dough onto a lightly floured surface. Knead for 10 minutes or until smooth and elastic. Brush a bowl with oil. Add dough. Turn to coat.

3. Cover with a damp tea towel. Set aside in a warm place for 30 minutes or until dough doubles in size. Punch down dough with your fist.

4. Knead for 30 seconds or until dough is original size. Split the dough into quarters. Cover 3 portions with a damp tea towel. Roll out the other portion to 30cm long and 10-12cm wide.

5. Use your fingers to press the base, avoiding the edge, to make indents. This stops it rising in the centre. Repeat with remaining dough.

To make the pesto

1. Place the semi-dried tomatoes and macadamia oil in a blender and process until smooth. Add macadamias, chopped rosemary and semi-dried tomato oil – start with 1 tablespoon first then if still dry add 1 more.

2. Pulse until the macadamias are chopped roughly and a pesto consistency is achieved.

To assemble the pizza

1. Preheat a chargrill on high heat. Lightly brush eggplant and zucchini with macadamia oil.

2. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes each side or until tender.

3. Preheat oven to 220°C fan-forced. Place pizza bases on baking trays. Spread a thin layer of pesto over each.

4. Top with grilled vegetables and capsicum.

5. Tear the bocconcini into small pieces and place on top of the vegetables.

6. Place the pizzas into the pre-heated oven and bake for 7-10 minutes. Add the macadamias and cook for a further 3-5 minutes or until bases are crisp.

7. Remove to a board, slice. Top with rocket and season with pepper. Serve.

Recipe from Australian Macadamias.

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