5 reasons to run in the morning

Understand how running in the morning can change your life, and why you should start now.

Starting your day with a morning run is one of the best things you can do for yourself. It’s a great way to wake up, release some mood-enhancing endorphins, and set your day up for success.

The world is still asleep, the streets are quiet and the air feels crisp in your lungs. Ask anyone who’s in the habit of an early morning run and they will be sure to tell you how beneficial and peaceful they find it.

Waking up early to run can be difficult though, especially if you’re a night owl. If that’s you, check out our article on how to become a morning runner. If you can get into the habit, here’s some of the benefits you’ll reap if you get up with the sun for an early morning run.

“Many people find that running early in the morning noticeably lowers their stress levels throughout the day.”

1. It sets you up for a calmer day

Many people find that running early in the morning noticeably lowers their stress levels throughout the day. This is especially relevant if you’re prone to bouts of morning anxiety. Start the day out right with a good dose of exercise and it can even contribute to changes in your brain, making you less susceptible to stress and anxiety.

2. It gives you the gift of time

We all want more hours in the day. It can be difficult to motivate yourself to hit the gym or do a loop of your favourite running track after work, when you’re tired and life keeps getting in the way. But if you can get up early and smash out a workout first thing, that frees up extra time in your afternoons and evenings.

3. You can get the kids involved

If you’ve got kids, a morning jog is a great way to spend some quality time with them. By getting up earlier, you might even avoid the dreaded morning rush getting the kids ready for school. Kids are natural runners, and are sure to add some pep to your step – see why you should start running with your kids here.

4. It may help lower your blood pressure

Do you have high blood pressure? Research has shown that early morning exercise can help with that. Scientists from Appalachian State University found that early morning exercise may help reduce blood pressure by 10% during the day, and up to 25% at night.

5. You’ll avoid the crowds and traffic

Waking up while the world is sleeping gives you a wonderful sense of peace and quiet. You’ll have the streets, parks and trails to yourself, and especially if you live in an urban area, running in the early morning means there are less cars out and about. This also means there’s less pollution in the air that you breathe – so your lungs benefit as well.

Get started with parkrun

Medibank is proud to partner with parkrun, a non-profit organisation that hosts weekly 5 km running events, all across Australia and the world. Best of all, it’s held early in the morning on a Saturday or Sunday, and it’s 100% free. It’s not about competing with other people – it’s about pushing yourself to be better, one step at a time.

On 3 September 2016, head on down to your local parkrun for Personal Better Day, set yourself a challenge and experience for yourself how good it feels.

Take the first step and find out more about Personal Better Day.

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