5 winter fitness tips from Michelle Bridges

The superstar trainer shares her ideas for staying active in the colder months.

When the temperature drops, it’s easy to lose motivation to keep up with a regular exercise routine.

But as tempting as it can be to stay curled up in bed, Michelle Bridges says winter is the perfect time to kickstart your healthy lifestyle. You just need an extra dose of inspiration to get you moving and keep you focused on your goals.

“Ask yourself: what do you want?” Michelle says. “Whether it’s to run a half marathon or to lose five kilos, knowing what you want is the first step to making any kind of change.”

Once you know what your goals are, it’s time to make an action plan and take the first step. Or as Michelle likes to say, “Just freaking do it.”

To keep you motivated this winter, Michelle shares a few tips for getting moving in the cooler months.

1. Go to bed early to rise early and train

Set an alarm and just do it! You might not wake up raring to go – but if you make a commitment to yourself, you can get out there. Then you’ll get your workout out of the way first thing, boosting your mood and energy and setting you up for a fantastic day ahead. Plus, your body will continue to burn extra calories throughout the day.

For more motivation, here are some tips for slaying exercise excuses.

2. Train at lunch time

It’s a great way to fit exercise into your day – even better if you can get some colleagues involved too. Look into joining a gym near work, or think about what kind of free activities you can do. Maybe there’s a park nearby where you can get out for a jog or some circuit training, or you could even go for a power walk around a local shopping centre.

Check out more ideas for being active in the workplace here.

“Try power yoga – it’s a more vigorous form of yoga that will get you feeling strong, fit and flexible.”

 

3. Do power yoga

It’s a more vigorous form of yoga that will get you feeling strong, fit and flexible – and get you working up a serious sweat. To really get your heart rate going, give hot yoga a try.

4. Go swimming at an indoor pool

No need to brave the cold – an indoor pool is the perfect place to work out in the colder months. And if you don’t like swimming laps, you can still get a fantastic pool-based workout. Head to the shallow end and try some of these water-aerobics moves.

5. Arrange active family activities

Make time with the kids fun and active for everyone – you could start up a game of basketball or cricket, go ten pin bowling (pack you own food through!), take a family bike ride or head out on a gentle hike together.

 

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